CBD not a home for the homeless

Melbourne researcher James Petty suggests that rough sleepers are among those worse affected by this growing securitisation, and urged alertness to how all developments are shaping our public space. “Some [defensive design] looks clearly hostile, what we’re seeing is more subtle and aesthetically pleasing,” he said “this doesn’t look scary, often more neutral.” Of note was the erection of scaffolding outside Flinders St Station directly on the site previously popular among homeless sleepers. This site was the subject of an attempted eviction last year amongst a proposed ban on homelessness in the CBD which was later rescinded after mass protest. “There are little signs of construction commencing there, but it’s certainly no longer available to the homeless.”

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Argument against legalising the sale of kidneys

The issue with this line of thinking arises from how we can apply this thinking to other more undesirable outcomes. While the transference of kidneys is acceptable due to the lessened risk to the donor and tolerable quality of life, that distinction becomes more clouded when discussing the transference of limbs or more crucial organs. Would the sale of an arm or an eyeball represent too large of a loss of quality of life, or is it more repugnant due to its overtness? Radin suggests that “to preserve organ donation as an opportunity for altruism is also one way of keeping from our view the desperation of poor people.” (Kyriazi, 2015) Certainly here it would be difficult to ignore the plight of the poor in good conscience were they required to blatantly disassemble themselves to survive.

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Nike Commodity Chain Analysis

Nike’s brand focus has always been social; developing ‘campuses’, clubs and sponsorships as much as product design. This means that internalisation and manufacturing skill were not an advantage Nike possessed; especially given much of the manual labour is unskilled and accessible internationally. With nothing constraining them to traditional manufacturing in America and Europe, the lower wages, supply costs and reduced oversight available in Asia were very appealing. While largely welcomed by the budding economies Nike settled in, this enormous shift did leave employment holes in the manufacturing regions Nike abandoned (Mokhiber, 1994). Nike was now able to produce their shoes cheaper than before, with greater flexibility to shifting consumer demands and preferences and place greater focus on their internal specialities and efficiencies.

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Virtual Reality Cinema

Only holding eight viewing seats at the moment, Michael clearly envisions the future of VR to be very personal. Forfeiting your sight and hearing to transport your mind to another world could feel like an intensely voyeuristic experience, where you disconnect from your body entirely, but this is not the case here. Despite a partnership with the Melbourne Fringe Festival I was privy to a private ‘screening’ - seemingly not a rare occurrence, but very pleasant when hearing any rare movement can reassert an awareness of your blindness and disconnectedness.

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David Jones marketing channel recommendations

“Omni-channel” was used to refer to the utilisation of one core infrastructure to deliver a consistent experience across devices, consumers and channels to the customer. The “click and collect” initiative is highly evocative of this as it used existing brick-and-mortar infrastructure to provide a faster product to online shoppers via in-store pickups. As the products were already stocked in stores, it was simply a matter of establishing the infrastructure to process orders, but the pay-out for some consumers was huge.

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'Future of the Written Word'

Hosted in the Deakin Edge theatre the ‘Future of the Written’ word discussion cut a dark and gloomy train of thought through the Melbourne Writers Festival; designed to celebrate the potential directions and forces pushing the writing sphere. Opening with marketing experts Adam Pugh and Ben Birchall we mourned the written word as falling into disrepair and disregard. A desire for content munching and clicks having relegated it to a functional role easily replaceable by the cacophony of other stories and advertising we are expected to consume and connect with.

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South China Sea & Representative Journalism

China’s claim and movements in the South China Sea are both politically charged and highly complex activities, prompting a complicated array of responses to the developments. Each of the provided publications focuses on a different aspect and outcome of the sudden focus on the region, and appears to share a bias or point-of-view consistent with the nationality of the publication. None of the articles openly lie; each could be defined as ‘truthful’, however the varying priorities and perspectives are readily apparent by the details each article focuses on.

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PACmen Review

While documenting this hype and excitement Walker’s film is at its strongest, charting events and introducing an array of volunteers and PAC employees. Their interactions feel natural and Walker’s presence unobtrusive, it is a testimony to his fly-on-the-wall camera work that this time spent feels genuinely exciting (and some clever editing inserts some uncertainty sans-voiceover). Unfortunately Carson’s tale does not end climactically, and the slow burn of his campaign into obscurity largely matches the liveliness of the documentary.

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JournalismAlex DurrantReview
Self-harming arson charges appealed

A Melbournian woman has successfully appealed her 4 year sentence, after being found guilty of setting fire to her own home. Her sentence has been amended to her 290 days served in prison already, after disputing the case due to her deteriorating mental condition while in confinement. Ms Jennifer Martin, 59 pleaded guilty in September 2014 to two charges of arson, after twice setting her living room ablaze

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KidNapping of artists' voice

iTunes’ enormous initial success was not only born from the rapidly growing iPod brand but Apple’s willingness to embrace traditional pricing systems. Much like Napster the purchasing power was entirely with the consumer, only now it was so easy. To woo record companies turned sceptical by the rise of piracy Apple could offer a non-intrusive DRM system, and allow them to embrace the digital age without acknowledging Napster and its look-a-likes as an incredibly important promotional tool.

It is fair to say that the online distribution services we take for granted were born from Napster and its following entourage of other Peer-to-Peer networks, each one a little less quasi-legal than the last.

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